Pseudopolis – Pseudopolis EP (Redstone Press)

A new label, from my neck of the woods in the Scottish highlands, and therefore I’ve an idea of the way the hunger for new music and the wonkiness of relative isolation can feed into the mindset. In my day, it was mostly metal which was the music of choice for Highland youth, morphing slowly over the years into happy hardcore and the more straight up forms of bangy techno. Not that this debut EP is either, and I admit to be being pleasantly surprised by the tunes here. I’ll go ahead and say it – this is great stuff.

What leaps out of the music straight away is that it refuses to limit itself to a particular direction. Instead it veers closest to the sort of wild invention and killer jams which Bristol folks have been slamming out for a while now, and there is a similar disregard for hard genre limits on show. Pseudopolis exhibit a profound sense on adventure across the three tracks, taking in bits of house and techno and using them to colour the bones of something which really lies closer to dubstep, jungle, and even a wee bit of dance hall, in vibe. The result is a strong release which has a gleeful sense of doing something right by doing it wrong. Really, it shouldn’t work as well as it does, but it ends up tight and brilliantly alive. The grooves flourish under a procession of chunky, occasionally day-glo moods and energies which ramp up both the sense of fun and seriousness. At Last bubbles with a seductive cheekiness, mainlining all those dry ice and strobe moments which are burnt into your subconsciousness. We Can All Groove slows everything right down and wraps up the movement with thick darkness.

Tracer is the definite standout; a joyous, rhythmic, burst of bright colour which hits up all the spots suggested by the other two tunes, but takes it further and makes more of a particular tribal heft which was only hinted at elsewhere. There is a kindred vibe to The sort of stuff Randomer has been working out his system over the last few years – nods to garage and dark, crunchy, house are filtered through a palpable sense of drama, and encapsulates a lot of what’s good in current UK electronica away from the big room beats.

It’s always interesting when a new label or a new act come out of the gates without doffing their caps to what everyone else it doing. And while there might be more Bristolly influenced stuff kicking around than there used to be, that’s still got to be better than yet another collection of tunes making their pilgrimage to Detroit, Chicago or New York. Check it out.