Reviews Ahoy! Dead Sound – This Is Human (Null+Void Recordings); CEM3340 – Perfect Stranger (Lunar Orbiter Program)

CEM3340 – Perfect Stranger (Lunar Orbiter Program)

A first album for the shadowy electro act lands on Lunar Orbiter Program, brining with it a collection of tunes that burn through the harsher parts of the genre’s last 20-odd years without offering much new information to that which you might have gleaned from the two previous EPs. The blend of electro culled from the harder end of the spectrum, and run through a heavier lo-fi take on the basic sound than we usually hear in the genre, is immediately pleasing. As are CEM 3340’s grooves, many of which recall the likes of old-schoolers such as Posatronix and similar Detroit technobass heroes, as well as newer acts like Go Nuclear and Detroit’s Filthiest, in their floor shattering simplicity and movement. I’ve spoken before about the suspicion that the music is a little too perfect, a little too designed to push the buttons of old bastards like me, but I’ve mostly made my peace with that. When the tunes are as solid as this, who cares about anything other than the end result?

The breakbeat tracks here are every bit as grimy and thrilling as you would expect. Tunes like Shadow Of A Blond, and Story Of An Egyptian Man, are big hitters; thick bass and crunching beats; melodic touches serve to accent the pumping rhythms. It’s a template that works well throughout, even if it is occasionally a little short on true invention. This mix of new school methodology and old school kicks finds its peak on the relentlessly wriggling I Can’t Get Wrong where a low slung bass holds court and the razor-edged pads hold you at knife point.

When the album deviates from the breaks, it moves onto less certain ground. Jammin’ In The Dark, and Platform Discovery pitch themselves towards the more Body Music end of the proceedings and lack the fizzing energy which make the pure electro hitters so fine. Tormented Man struggles under a thick bass that isn’t nearly as precise as it needs to be for the task at hand, and the tune ends up orbiting the sand-blasted landscape of the sort of wonky, vageuely weird techno that flickered briefly in the 90s. Not a bad tune, just underwhelming compared to the high promise elsewhere in the album.

Dead Sound – This Is Human (Null+Void Recordings)

Dead Sound’s previous work has mostly been found in the world of harder techno, and scattered across a host of like-minded labels such as Perc Trax, Gynoid, and DSNT, but this first release on Null+Void reveals a far more rounded and looser sound. While it’s interesting to see what established electro acts take from elsewhere, we don’t really tend to talk about what other genres take from us; This Is Human provides some interesting insights to that conversation.

Of course, it’s not all electro, and the one straight-up techno piece, title track This Is Human is a fine, borderline-sleazy knockabout replete with a frayed, gurning, vibe which lollops pleasingly in subterranean shadows. Neither builder nor peaktime, it simply bounces back and forth, happy just to entertain itself. It’s a lot of fun, and there seems to be less and less tunes we can say that about these days.

From the point of view of our usual geekiness, though, it’s the other tracks which offer something closer to home. First Line is both the most serious and the most evocative. Perhaps it’s the way it skirts around the edge of a loose take on IDM, but it feels like a gateway rather than the journey itself. Having said that, there is something about its slow build and it’s retrained box of sounds and tricks which emphasises a particularly anxious tautness that manages to both energise the track and pick up the slack left by the underweight beats.

I Want You feels at first as if it should be flickering around the same neighbourhood as First Line, but instead it pulls at loose threads of classic electro and weaves them into new fabrics with which to dress up a tight, noirish, mover. This is a great tune, sounding as it does like the theme from some bleak Scandinavian thriller about murderous shenanigans set against a high-tech back story. Luckily, it doesn’t overdo the vibe, and locks it all down with some fine, very low slung grooves. Fair, finally, goes for broke, dragging in something of This Is Human’s joyful wobble with a rolling breakbeat and coming out at the daylight end with a smile on its huge, daft face. And, like the rest of the EP, what it might lack in a bona fide stand out moment, it makes up for with simple and effective funk.

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